About

Do you want to develop deeper knowledge in health law, policy and ethics to supplement your career or studies? Or perhaps see if a career or studies in this field is right for you? Our Summer Institute is a one-week online intensive program for professionals and university students offering an immersion in the theory and practice of health law. In 2021, students will learn to identify and analyze the legal, policy and ethical implications of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Attendees

No prior experience or legal training is required. The Summer Institute is for people interested in learning more about the legal ramifications of COVID-19. Students come from diverse professional backgrounds, but our program is designed to be most useful to professionals with a health background and prospective law students. Please note class size is limited, and we encourage you to apply promptly.

Format

The program runs full-time over five days and encompasses 20 hours of seminars and workshops and 10 hours of group discussion. You’ll join live lectures with breakout discussions, participate in Q&A, and have direct access to some of the leading experts in the field. You can expect interactive seminars designed to facilitate peer learning, interaction, as well as opportunities to network with fellow students. The sessions will be held through Zoom, supplemented with the Teachable platform.

Cost

The cost of the Institute is $1,200 (CAD), payable upon admission. Students completing the course will receive a Certificate in Health Law – COVID-19 from the University of Ottawa Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics. A limited number of bursaries are also available to applicants who show financial need.

Sessions

Basic Principles of the Canadian Legal System

Monday am

Throughout this session, Professor Chen will set the stage with an introductory overview of some of the fundamental principles that govern Canadian law. You will examine the various legislative tools and provisions that have made up Canada’s Constitution, common law, civil law, statutes, regulations, federalism and human rights frameworks.

Basic Principles of the Canadian Legal System

Monday am

Throughout this session, Professor Chen will set the stage with an introductory overview of some of the fundamental principles that govern Canadian law. You will examine the various legislative tools and provisions that have made up Canada’s Constitution, common law, civil law, statutes, regulations, federalism and human rights frameworks.

Y.Y. Brandon Chen

Y.Y. Brandon Chen (SJD, MSW, JD, University of Toronto; BSc, Emory University) is an Assistant Professor at the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law. A lawyer and social worker by training, Professor Chen’s research program examines laws and policies that contribute to health inequities and marginalization, particularly among noncitizens and racialized minorities. His published work has touched on such topics as health rights litigation, refugee health care, social determinants of health, health care solidarity, and medical tourism.

Aside from his research, Professor Chen engages in a variety of community-based work. Between 2009 and 2011 he was appointed to the Ontario Advisory Committee on HIV/AIDS, where he advised the provincial Minister of Health on HIV/AIDS-related policies. From 2014 to 2016 he served as the Co-Chair of the Committee for Accessible AIDS Treatment, which works to advance the health and wellbeing of immigrants, refugees and non-status people living with HIV/AIDS. And from 2016 to 2020 he sat on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Centre on Statelessness. He is currently the law school’s faculty lead for the Navigating Ottawa Resources to Improve Health (NORTH) Clinic.

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Fundamentals of Health Law

Monday pm

This session will begin with an overview of the Canadian health law system at the federal level and then move to look at specific aspects of health systems and healthcare governance at provincial and local levels in Canada. What you learn in this session will help you understand aspects of Canadian health law and how it is carried out through its major players on the Canadian scene.

Fundamentals of Health Law

Monday pm

This session will begin with an overview of the Canadian health law system at the federal level and then move to look at specific aspects of health systems and healthcare governance at provincial and local levels in Canada. What you learn in this session will help you understand aspects of Canadian health law and how it is carried out through its major players on the Canadian scene.

Michael Da Silva

Michael Da Silva is the Alex Trebek Postdoctoral Fellow in A.I. and Health Care in the University of Ottawa Faculty of Law and a Research Associate on the Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR)-funded project entitled Machine M.D.: How Should We Regulate A.I. in Health Care? Michael is also affiliated with the Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics and the Centre for Law, Technology, and Society. He previously served as a CIHR Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the McGill University Faculty of Law and Institute for Health and Social Policy. In addition to A.I., his research interests include health law, policy, and ethics; public law; moral philosophy; and the intersections between them. His first book, The Pluralist Right to Health Care: A Framework and Case Study, will soon be published by the University of Toronto Press. He is also the co-editor for a forthcoming special issue of Bioethics on health rights and published in several venues, including Public Health Ethics, the Journal of Value Inquiry, the Michigan Journal of International Law, and the Review of Constitutional Studies.


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Global Public Health Law

Tuesday am

On day two, Professor Houston will introduce public health law from an international perspective. After introducing some basic principles of international law and some of the key organizations (like the WHO) and legal instruments (like the International Health Regulations) that affect health, this session will trace the roots of international health law from its beginnings, passing through pandemics from cholera through SARS to COVID-19, examining other areas (like trade law) that may impact a pandemic response, and exploring lessons learned (and not learned).

Global Public Health Law

Tuesday am

On day two, Professor Houston will introduce public health law from an international perspective. After introducing some basic principles of international law and some of the key organizations (like the WHO) and legal instruments (like the International Health Regulations) that affect health, this session will trace the roots of international health law from its beginnings, passing through pandemics from cholera through SARS to COVID-19, examining other areas (like trade law) that may impact a pandemic response, and exploring lessons learned (and not learned).

Adam Houston

Adam R. Houston (JD, MA, LLM) works at the intersection of health, human rights and globalization with a focus on access to medicines and the role of law in the response to infectious disease. He has worked with organizations across Canada and around the world on a wide range of issues, including reconciling disparate policy approaches towards HIV and tuberculosis, and United Nations accountability for the Haitian cholera epidemic. He is currently the Medical Policy & Advocacy Officer for Médecins sans frontières/Doctors Without Borders Canada (MSF). He has also taught courses on topics relating to health, human rights and international law at multiple universities.

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Civil Liberties

Tuesday pm

In this afternoon session, Professor Flood will speak on civil liberties, and particularly on the restrictions imposed on them in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Adopting a domestic and international lens, the session will consider the various lockdowns, travel restrictions, and vaccine-related issues such as mandatory vaccination and vaccine passports.

Civil Liberties

Tuesday pm

In this afternoon session, Professor Flood will speak on civil liberties, and particularly on the restrictions imposed on them in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Adopting a domestic and international lens, the session will consider the various lockdowns, travel restrictions, and vaccine-related issues such as mandatory vaccination and vaccine passports.

Colleen Flood

Colleen M. Flood is Professor at the University of Ottawa and a University Research Chair in Health Law & Policy. She is also inaugural Director of the University of Ottawa Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics. From 2000–2015 she was a Professor and Canada Research Chair at the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, with cross-appointments to the School of Public Policy and the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation. From 2006–2011 she served as Scientific Director at the Canadian Institute for Health Services and Policy Research (CIHR). Her primary areas of scholarship are comparative health care law and policy, public/private financing of health care systems, health care reform, constitutional law, administrative law, and accountability and governance issues more broadly.

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Health Equity

Wednesday am

This session will focus on the impact of COVID-19 on minority and ethnic groups. Beginning with Indigenous populations, it will touch on Indigenous and Aboriginal law and look at the different ways these communities were impacted by the pandemic and how First Nations took action. It will also examine the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on other ethnic and minority groups. Finally, it will discuss the issue of hate crimes during the pandemic.

Health Equity

Wednesday am

This session will focus on the impact of COVID-19 on minority and ethnic groups. Beginning with Indigenous populations, it will touch on Indigenous and Aboriginal law and look at the different ways these communities were impacted by the pandemic and how First Nations took action. It will also examine the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on other ethnic and minority groups. Finally, it will discuss the issue of hate crimes during the pandemic.

Signa Daum Shanks

Signa A. Daum Shanks is a professor at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University. Her teaching has included classes such as Aboriginal Self-Government, Canadian Legal History, Indigenous Peoples and Canadian Law, Comparative Indigenous Legal Traditions, and Law and Economics. She has also taught at the summer program hosted at the Indigenous Law Centre in Saskatoon and the Nunavut Law Program in Iqaluit. Her research is concerned with law and economics, and Indigenous governance. She is a frequent commentator in the media on topics related to Indigenous peoples in North American, writing on diverse topics such as reconciliation, pipelines and Indigenous rights, and the use of Indigenous images in sports.

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Long-Term Care Homes

Wednesday pm (1)

Professor Flood will provide an overview of the horrible outbreaks in long-term care homes during the COVID-19 crisis. She will highlight some of the shortcomings that were reported by commissions and examine avenues for the law to address some of these issues and prevent or mitigate future outbreaks.

Long-Term Care Homes

Wednesday pm (1)

Professor Flood will provide an overview of the horrible outbreaks in long-term care homes during the COVID-19 crisis. She will highlight some of the shortcomings that were reported by commissions and examine avenues for the law to address some of these issues and prevent or mitigate future outbreaks.

Colleen Flood

Colleen M. Flood is Professor at the University of Ottawa and a University Research Chair in Health Law & Policy. She is also inaugural Director of the University of Ottawa Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics. From 2000–2015 she was a Professor and Canada Research Chair at the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, with cross-appointments to the School of Public Policy and the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation. From 2006–2011 she served as Scientific Director at the Canadian Institute for Health Services and Policy Research (CIHR). Her primary areas of scholarship are comparative health care law and policy, public/private financing of health care systems, health care reform, constitutional law, administrative law, and accountability and governance issues more broadly.

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Mental Health Law

Wednesday pm (2)

Professor Chandler will outline the Ontario Mental Health Act and provide insights into the impact of COVID-19 on people with mental disabilities, their hospitalization, and the treatment they are able to consent to and access. Finally, she will touch on human rights considerations and whether or not vaccines should be given to someone if their capacity is impaired due to mental health disability.

Mental Health Law

Wednesday pm (2)

Professor Chandler will outline the Ontario Mental Health Act and provide insights into the impact of COVID-19 on people with mental disabilities, their hospitalization, and the treatment they are able to consent to and access. Finally, she will touch on human rights considerations and whether or not vaccines should be given to someone if their capacity is impaired due to mental health disability.

Jennifer Chandler

Jennifer Chandler researches the legal and ethical aspects of biomedical science and technology. She is internationally recognized for her research and writing in the law and ethics of mental health and the brain sciences. She is a former member of the Board of Directors of the International Neuroethics Society, and serves on a number of international editorial and advisory boards boards in the field. She is co-editor of the book Law and Mind: Mental Health Law and Policy in Canada (LexisNexis Canada 2016). Jennifer also holds the Bertram Loeb Chair in Organ Donation and Transplantation Research, a field that has intersections with mind/brain law at issues such as neurological determination of death (brain death) prior to donation. Jennifer holds degrees in Law from Harvard University and Queen’s University, and served as clerk to the Hon. Mr. Justice John Sopinka of the Supreme Court of Canada.

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Virtual Health Care and Professional Regulation

Thursday am

Professor Gruben will cover virtual healthcare and professional regulations. During the COVID-19 pandemic, a drastic shift toward virtual healthcare took place. This session will explore the ways virtual healthcare was facilitated through an adaptation of professional regulations and best practices for remote care, and will touch on some of the issues arising from providing virtual care to patients. Finally, it will cover the ways professional regulations were adapted to account for new needs and limitations during a worldwide pandemic.

Virtual Health Care and Professional Regulation

Thursday am

Professor Gruben will cover virtual healthcare and professional regulations. During the COVID-19 pandemic, a drastic shift toward virtual healthcare took place. This session will explore the ways virtual healthcare was facilitated through an adaptation of professional regulations and best practices for remote care, and will touch on some of the issues arising from providing virtual care to patients. Finally, it will cover the ways professional regulations were adapted to account for new needs and limitations during a worldwide pandemic.

Vanessa Gruben

Vanessa Gruben is an Associate Professor at the University of Ottawa Faculty of Law, a member of the Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics, and Director of the Ottawa Hub for Harm Reduction. After graduating from the University of Ottawa’s Common Law program, she clerked for Chief Justice Richard of the Federal Court of Appeal and then Justice Bastarache of the Supreme Court of Canada. She is co-editor of the fifth edition of Canada’s leading text on health law and policy, Canadian Health Law and Policy (LexisNexis, 2017). Vanessa’s research focuses on professional self-regulation, assisted reproduction, organ donation, and harm reduction.

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Tort Liability

Thursday pm

Tort liability is legal liability springing from harm done by one party to another, whether intentionally or negligently. During the pandemic, we have had to come to grips with a new reality focused on mitigating the spread of infection. For example, businesses must now focus on balancing risk of infection with everyday operations, healthcare systems on balancing treatment and containment of COVID with traditional healthcare priorities. This session will touch on potential sources and limits of tort liability in such areas.

Tort Liability

Thursday pm

Tort liability is legal liability springing from harm done by one party to another, whether intentionally or negligently. During the pandemic, we have had to come to grips with a new reality focused on mitigating the spread of infection. For example, businesses must now focus on balancing risk of infection with everyday operations, healthcare systems on balancing treatment and containment of COVID with traditional healthcare priorities. This session will touch on potential sources and limits of tort liability in such areas.

Lorian Hardcastle

Lorian Hardcastle is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Calgary, with a joint appointment to the Department of Community Health Sciences in the Cumming School of Medicine. She is also a member of the One Health Consortium, O’Brien Institute for Public Health, and Conjoint Health Research Ethics Board at the University of Calgary. Lorian obtained her J.D. from Dalhousie University, and her LL.M. and S.J.D. from the University of Toronto. She also completed a fellowship at the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law in the U.S.

Lorian is currently involved in research on antimicrobial resistance (funded by Alberta's Major Innovation Fund), artificial intelligence and health (funded by the CIHR), regulation of long-term care, and legal and policy issues arising from COVID-19. Lorian's work has been published in numerous legal and health policy journals including the Canadian Medical Association Journal, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Healthcare Policy, Alberta Law Review, Queen's Law Journal, and Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics. Lorian is a frequent contributor to health policy debates in the media. Her writing has appeared in several Canadian newspapers including the Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, Calgary Herald, Edmonton Journal, and Ottawa Citizen.

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Digital Health Privacy

Friday am

The COVID-19 pandemic has raised numerous issues for the protection of personal information. In an attempt to flatten the curve, various contact tracing applications were deployed around the world, and these applications breached or impeded people’s privacy to various degrees. Professor Martin-Bariteau will touch on privacy in pandemic times by exploring various privacy laws as well as the changes contemplated to these laws. He will then provide an overview of current technologies, such as the COVID Alert App, and of upcoming technologies vis à vis privacy.

Digital Health Privacy

Friday am

The COVID-19 pandemic has raised numerous issues for the protection of personal information. In an attempt to flatten the curve, various contact tracing applications were deployed around the world, and these applications breached or impeded people’s privacy to various degrees. Professor Martin-Bariteau will touch on privacy in pandemic times by exploring various privacy laws as well as the changes contemplated to these laws. He will then provide an overview of current technologies, such as the COVID Alert App, and of upcoming technologies vis à vis privacy.

Florian Martin-Bariteau

Dr. Florian Martin-Bariteau is an Associate Professor of Law and Technology at the Faculty of Law and the Director of the Centre for Law, Technology and Society at the University of Ottawa. A technologist and creative turned legal scholar, his research focuses on technology law, ethics and policy, with a special interest in blockchain, artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, whistleblowers and intellectual property. Recipient of the 2019 Common Law Emergent Researcher Award, Dr. Florian Martin-Bariteau is an internationally recognized thought leader on technology policy, engaged in shaping frameworks that safeguard rights and liberties in the digital context. His research is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) of Canada, as well as by several foundations and philanthropic gifts. Building on and developing his doctoral work, his first book, Le droit de marque, was the runner-up for the 2018 Walter Owen Book Prize celebrating Canada’s best legal publications. Dr. Martin-Bariteau serves on the Board of Directors of the NCE SERENE-RISC, Canada’s smart cybersecurity network.

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Licensing and Procurement of Vaccines, Treatments, Supplies, and Technologies for COVID-19

Friday pm

This session will cover various topics around the licensing and procurement of supplies and technology related to COVID-19. Professor Wilson will cover vaccine policy in Canada and offer a breakdown of the new vaccine injury program. He will touch on vaccine trials and the issues surrounding the lack of data sharing between the provinces and the federal government. Professor Attaran will discuss failures in the procurement of supplies, vaccines, the vaccine rollout, and vaccine development both domestically and abroad.

Licensing and Procurement of Vaccines, Treatments, Supplies, and Technologies for COVID-19

Friday pm

This session will cover various topics around the licensing and procurement of supplies and technology related to COVID-19. Professor Wilson will cover vaccine policy in Canada and offer a breakdown of the new vaccine injury program. He will touch on vaccine trials and the issues surrounding the lack of data sharing between the provinces and the federal government. Professor Attaran will discuss failures in the procurement of supplies, vaccines, the vaccine rollout, and vaccine development both domestically and abroad.

Amir Attaran

Amir Attaran is a Professor in the Faculty of Law and School of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Ottawa. Professor Attaran is by training both a lawyer (LL.B., Vancouver) and a biologist (D. Phil, Oxford; M.S., Caltech; B.A., Berkeley). His research covers the gamut of both fields to explore different drivers of human well-being. Current research interests include the social and policy determinants of health in both infections and non-infectious disease; constitutional, administrative, and environmental law in Canada, particularly focused on biodiversity and climate change; and intellectual property and criminal law in the provision of medicines. Professor Attaran is also an active litigator and has appeared in the courts of Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec, and Saskatchewan, as well as the federal courts.

Kumanan Wilson

Dr. Kumanan Wilson is a specialist in General Internal Medicine at The Ottawa Hospital, CEO of CANImmunize, and an innovation advisor for Bruyère. A Professor and Faculty of Medicine Clinical Research Chair in Digital Health Innovation at the University of Ottawa, he is also a member of the University of Ottawa’s Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics.

Dr. Wilson is the CEO and founder of CANImmunize, a science-based technology company that spun out from The Ottawa Hospital in 2019. CANImmunize is a pan-Canadian digital immunization tracking system available as a mobile app and through a web portal, designed to help Canadians keep track of their vaccinations. Dr. Wilson and his team are currently focused on digital immunization solutions to help combat the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Wilson’s research focuses on digital health, immunization, pandemic preparedness and public health policy and innovation. His research on immunization has explored social media’s impact on vaccine hesitancy, and evaluation of vaccine safety using health services data and vaccine policy. Other research interests include blood safety and newborn screening, and health ethics, law and policy. His research has been supported by CIHR, WHO, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Canada’s Immunity Task Force.

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FAQ

Who is the Institute for?

The Institute is for people interested in learning more about the legal ramifications of COVID-19. Selected participants will include both students and professionals. Please note the Institute may not be a good fit for you if you have already completed legal studies. If uncertain, don’t hesitate to contact us at healthlaw@uottawa.ca.

What do I need?

All sessions will be held through Zoom. As such, you will need a device with a microphone, camera, and internet connection. For system requirements for Zoom, please see here. The sessions will also be recorded and made available exclusively to you for 12 months on Teachable, which has similar requirements.

Do I need to attend the sessions in real time?

You do not. However, we strongly recommend that you do. We are purposely holding live sessions and keeping our cohort small to allow for rich direct interaction between instructors and students. So, while the sessions will be recorded and available to you asynchronously, you should attempt to attend them live.

What is the language of instruction?

All sessions will be in English.

Will I get University credits for participating in the Institute?

Upon completion of the Institute, you will receive a Certificate in Health Law – COVID-19 from the University of Ottawa Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics (CHLPE). While CHLPE is an official Centre within the University, it is unable to grant University of Ottawa course credits directly. That said, if you are a student at the University of Ottawa, it may be possible to get credits with the completion of additional requirements (for example, a paper). This may also involve additional fees payable to the University of Ottawa. This is at the discretion of the University. Please don’t hesitate to contact us at healthlaw@uottawa.ca for more information.

Will there by opportunities outside the Institute?

In addition to its training aspect, we intend the Summer Institute to create and connect a community of people interested in health law, policy and ethics. We will provide opportunities to stay active and involved within this community after the Institute ends. As one example, we organize occasional evening sessions with leading experts and public health officials that are exclusive to Institute alumni.

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